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4 July. Eco warriors and their tribe in North Norfolk. 35 miles.

What a day to choose to ride around North Norfolk! Maurice got it spot on with his weather forecast when he decided to choose a circuit from Fakenham for what turned out to be a glorious ride in perfect conditions. Assembling incognito in Morrison’s car park, or at least that was the plan, Maurice was joined by Andrew, Sandra, Keith, Brian, Ken, Roger, Charles and another eco warrior, Martin, who had borrowed Ann Worthing’s e-bike for the day. This was Martin’s first experience of an e-bike and he spent a happy day in eco mode, as did Maurice, marvelling at the speed, acceleration and range of the Trek bike.

This is sort of where we went, clockwise from Little Walsingham having first gone through the pretty villages of Little and Great Snoring on the way from Fakenham:

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A few modifications en route meant we cycled to Holkham Hall from the southern entrance and exited on the western side before visiting Burnham Thorpe and then stopping for coffee at The Hoste Arms in Burnham Market. The views on the way were stupendous:

 

 

 

Note the sad condition of the Lord Nelson pub in Burnham Thorpe (bottom row) which we last visited 3 years ago. There was still a lot of Nelson memorabilia in the pub at the time which hopefully as been preserved.

After coffee we set off for Wells via Burnham Overy Staithe and Holkham but did not take the path parallel to the beach behind the pine trees as time was pressing, or was it the thought of all that seafood in Wells fast disappearing on such a gorgeous day? A windmill seen from a distance near Burnham Thorpe, which can just be seen in the poppy pic above, came into closer view over the marshes on the way to Burnham Overy Staithe:

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Where shall we go for lunch? That was the big topic of conversation on entering Wells, minus Charles who had to head for home at Holkham.  Should it be The Wells Crab House where a group of Windmillers had enjoyed an excellent evening meal 2 years ago whilst on a 2 day outing to Norfolk? No, that was full. How about that pub at the top end of town or the one in the middle? Both sounded good but then a table was spotted on the good ship Albatros moored alongside the quay and the matter was settled quickly. The next hour or so was probably one of the most memorable lunches in the history of the Windmill Club. Words cannot describe the view from the boat as the tide was coming in, nor the conversation with the Dutch skipper who told us all about the history of the boat transporting horses during the First World War. These pics tell the story a lot better:

 

Note the Dutch pancakes, the excellent pints of Wherry and Roger, Ken and Martin listening intently to the Dutch skipper.

A quick visit after lunch to the Wells and Walsingham light railway terminus resulted in us just missing a train but we had an interesting conversation with the station master who, as Ken observed, looked more like a New York cop. Then it was back to Fakenham via Great and Little Walsingham but stopping at the spot near Great Snoring where John Tarrington sadly had a fall and broke his wrist badly. We held a minute’s silence in his memory.

Thanks to Maurice for organising such a great route and of course to Andrew for getting us to the starting line on time. Slapped wrists for those who didn’t obey his command to spread out in Morrison’s car park to avoid being caught for not shopping! And thanks also to Brian and Andrew for many of the above pics, and to Ann Worthing for the loan of her e-bike, and to Ken for carting it there.

Martin

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